Crash for Cash UK Top 20 Hotspots

by TTWpartners

Crash for Cash

Are you aware that organised gangs are staging car crashes to commit insurance fraud? As part of a national scam worth roughly £400m a year, criminals are orchestrating accidents to make fraudulent insurance claims, the profits of which are used to fund other crimes, including illegal firearms and drug smuggling.

Crash for Cash scams are not a victimless crime. As honest policyholders we pick up a collective bill for fraud through increased premiums. Are you happy giving fraudsters £50 of your money each and every year?

Contact Cheatline anonymously on 0800 422 0421 if you know anything about crash for cash scams or use their dedicated anonymous online form. Information about crash for cash scams cannot be accepted by Crimestoppers, instead the dedicated Cheatline telephone number or anonymous online form should be used.

Cheatline is an anonymous fraud reporting service powered by Crimestoppers.

Crash for Cash infographic_Nov2013_1200

Induced Incident – How it works
  • The Frame – the car in front slams on its brakes for no obvious reason giving the victim no time to prevent a collision.
  • The Blame – they insist that it’s the victim’s fault and give them their name and address and the details of their insurance company, sometimes already written down on a piece of paper.
  • The Claim – A few weeks later (though sometimes longer) the victim will receive a letter from their insurance company notifying them of a grossly exaggerated claim including the costs of a recovery vehicle, car hire and whiplash injuries to passengers, none of which actually happened.
Insurance Fraud Bureau report

You can find out more in a report published by the Insurance Fraud Bureau (IFB)

Induced Accidents

‘Crash for Cash’ fraudsters are “gambling with the lives of UK motorists” and costing honest policyholders nearly £400 million every year, according to a report published by the Insurance Fraud Bureau (IFB).

 

The IFB was set up in 2006 to clamp down on organised insurance fraud – to disrupt criminal gangs and protect consumers from the effects of fraud. You can find out more about the IFB on their website.

taken from this site: https://crimestoppers-uk.org/get-involved/our-campaigns/national-campaigns/crash-for-cash

Drivers using ‘dash cams’ to fight fraud

by TTWpartners

Drivers using ‘dash cams’ to fight fraud

More and more drivers are using in-car cameras to help prove their innocence in road accidents, according to new research.

in-car-camera

Motorists in the UK are increasingly installing in-car or dashboard cameras in their cars to prove they are not at fault for crashes.

The in-car video cameras, which record the driver’s view from the windscreen, are designed to film journeys and capture events before, during and after a collision.

A new study by motoring organisation the AA has revealed that while only a small amount of its customers currently use the “dash-cams”, a growing number are expressing interest in them.

39% of drivers interested in dash-cams

The AA survey showed that 39 per cent of drivers would be interested in installing the cameras in their vehicles.

Some 29 per cent said they were not aware such devices existed, while 32 per cent said they had no interest in the cameras.

One per cent of the 25,000 people surveyed already had the cameras installed.

Some of the motorists already using dash-cams, which can cost up to £300, are employing them as a tool to combat so-called “crash for cash” fraudsters.

Cameras used to combat ’crash for cash’

These frauds are based on deliberate or invented collisions and the exaggerated or fictitious claims which result.

The Insurance Fraud Bureau has estimated such fake accidents are costing drivers almost £400 million a year.

Ian Crowder, an insurance expert at the AA, said: “It is the ‘crash for cash’ scams that have focused interest in the use of dash-cams.

“They can be of benefit in the event of a collision and the police would use such evidence, as would an insurer, in helping determine the circumstances of the event.

“They are already widely used in some countries like Russia, Poland and Japan.

“Unfortunately it is a sad thing that we would need to use these devices to demonstrate someone is being dishonest.”

Will dash-cams become mainstream

Matthew Paterson, head of liability claims at car insurance provider Admiral, says the industry is still unsure whether the market for dash-cams in the UK will continue to grow.

He said: “It’s hard to say whether they’ll become more widely used in the UK.

“The fraud issue in the UK is not quite as prevalent as other countries, and people won’t anticipate a situation where they’d require filmed evidence to help them.

“So while the evidence from dash-cams may be something insurers would like in determining liability and combating fraud, I’m not convinced they’ll become a big factor in the UK any time soon.”

Car collision on main road

Tristar Worldwide, a chauffeur company based in Middlesex, fitted dash-cams to all of its 460 vehicles in May.

Its fleet manager, Janusz Kozlowski, says the cameras have already resolved collision disputes and seen the company’s at-fault accident rate halved.

He said: “I expect the company to make savings of up to £60,000 a year based on fewer accidents and because we will be less likely to be targeted by ‘crash for cash’ fraud.”

Insurance discount for dash-cam drivers

Insurance company Adrian Flux has been offering a 15 per cent discount to drivers who install an approved dash-cam since spring 2012.

However, in general dash-cams are still not widely recognised by insurers at present.

AA car insurance expert, Crowder, added: “At the moment dash cameras are not a requirement for car insurance companies.

“However, if they were to become more widely installed by drivers then insurance companies ultimately will take a greater interest.

“They can be equally useful for insurers but motorists will be well aware that the recording could highlight their own driving error as well as those of others.”

article taken from here:

http://www.confused.com/car-insurance/articles/drivers-using-dashboard-cameras-to-fight-fraudsters